Advertisements for weekly fantasy football sites like DraftKings and FanDuel were everywhere during the 2014 NFL season and all that advertising money really paid off. Both sites posted major earnings for the final quarter of 2014.

According to reports on and, DraftKings and FanDuel earned $40 million and $37 million respectively during the final months of the year.

What makes these numbers even more impressive is how much they’ve grown since Q4 2013. Last year DraftKings posted just $3 million in revenue for this same time period while FanDuel is up from $7.4 million.

Those massive numbers mean that weekly fantasy football sites are likely to be a mainstay of North American internet gaming for a long time to come. Large revenue streams also mean weekly fantasy leagues (they’re not just for the NFL) are something casino affiliates should be checking out.

How is This Even Legal?

One of the biggest questions anyone who comes in contact with American weekly fantasy leagues has, is how they’re legal in the first place?

After all, the American Congress has worked tirelessly to impose the NFL’s desire to retain a sports betting prohibition across the land.

The catch with weekly fantasy football sites is that they are defined as, “games of skill.” (Why fantasy leagues qualify for this distinction while traditional sports handicapping doesn’t is something we’ll leave for you to figure out on your own.)

Both FanDuel and DraftKings have also benefited mightily from promotional deals with the NFL. Again, how these deals jibe with the league’s long-standing anti-gambling stance is anybody’s guess.

The Future of Weekly FF Leagues

Given the popularity of traditional fantasy football leagues, it’s safe to say that weekly leagues will continue to see solid growth.

As it stands, DraftKings and FanDuel have established some pretty impressive market share, though there’s likely to be plenty of new competitors entering the ring by Q4 2015.


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