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Registering new domains costing $100,000?

asked 1 year ago
I think this is important.

that said, can somebody explain to me what they’re saying? <span title=” title=”” class=”bbcode_smiley” />

new customized addresses? 100,000 to register a domain? somebody’s cashing in.

my understanding is this is allows anybody from any country to buy any .us or .uk etc whether they are in that country or not, is that right?

and the 100,000 price to register is for domains written in some foreign language … which would be the equivalent to a domain such as movies.com or insurance.com or gambling.com … is that right?

I don’t get it. where they get off charging that kind of price to register a domain?

Disputed domains will be auctioned to the highest bidder? and who gets to keep the profit?

Calls it an Internet milestone

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)
has voted to approve lifting restrictions on the classification
of domain names, allowing for new customized Web addresses.

A unanimous vote by ICANN members at a public meeting in Paris
paves the way for businesses and individuals to adopt domain
names based on any combination of letters. Previously domain
names had been limited by geography.

“This was an extremely successful meeting that will be remembered
as a milestone in the development of the Internet,” said Peter
Dengate Thrush, ICANN’s Board Chairman. “New generic Top Level
Domains and Internationalized Domain Names (IDNs) will open up
the Internet and make it look as diverse as the people who use it.”

ICANN also approved top – level domain names in scripts including
Arabic, Cyrillic and other non-Latin scripts. It passed a
resolution to eliminate domain tasting, a practice of using the
grace periods to register domain names in bulk to see which ones
are profitable.

The new domains could cost as much as $100,000 to register, and
will require a large amount of recourses to maintain.

ICANN said it would begin accepting applications for new domains
in April of 2009, with the first expected to be in operation by
the end of the year. The system is open to anyone, but applicants
have to have a “business plan and technical capacity” to be
eligible.

Disputed domains will be auctioned to the highest bidder, but
in some cases intellectual property law may help a business
acquire a name. ICANN will be able to reject a domain on
“morality or public order” grounds where it would then be
decided by an international arbitration committee.

The largest top-level domain is .com, with 71 million addresses,
followed by .de, the country code for Germany, with 11.2 million
and .net, with 10.6 million. The fastest growing is .cn, for
China, with 10.5 million addresses.

17 Answers
aleph answered 1 year ago
@Simmo! 167047 wrote:

Possible, but not necessarily – $100k (which may only apply to a few select domains anyway) is hardly out of the reach of serious small business or even an individual. And the business plan idea is a good approach in that regard. Even if it did, it strikes me one purpose of this is to ensure a domain’s potential is maximised. It sounds like it’s following the .tv standard in pricing by the way which seemed to work quite well in ensuring domains ended up in the hands of people that used them properly.

It’s all speculation right now anyway but if it helps improve the Internet user’s experience, that can only be an advantage. If it doesn’t then it’s either mismanaged or as many will no doubt assume from the off, it’s about money.

$100,000 is the base starting point … the best domains will be auctioned out

… you have to ensure proper technical expertise which has been estimated

to cost in the millions by some experts.

aleph answered 1 year ago
Dilution is dilution and will affect all .coms.

answered 1 year ago
@aleph 167081 wrote:

Applications Fees will cost be between $100,000 – $500,000 NON-

REFUNDABLE.

You must prove technical competence to run the registry which some estimate

can run into millions. This is designed for Big Corporations.

The internet is being catalogued and sold to Big Money interests.

All the domains in the new TLD can be kept, sold at whatever price

the owner pleases or rented. The best TLDs will be auctioned to the highest

bidder. Good luck with your application.

:rolleyes:

I suggest we wait and see. There is every likelihood existing registrars like GoDaddy etc will buy the TLD rights for the figures you state, then sell the domains much like they do with standard TLDs at the moment.

Last night read a long thread on this at DNForum (the leading domain name forum) and everyone there seems quite blasé about it with most speculating that while it will devalue a lot of extensions, .com will continue to rule for some years and all this means is lots more options are available.

The devaluing comes to resellers – they feel a lot of people will forego spending $20k acquiring “mycasino.com” and spend $20 acquiring “my.casino”, although if .com remains the #1 extension then it’s value is maintained. A lot depends how the search engines treat the new extensions. If they go the way of “.info” or “.biz” then they will be low value, short term at least. If Google decides to give them weighting then their value will rise.

ICANN stated the best TLD’s may be auctioned to the highest bidder. But that’s the TLD. Doesn’t concern us. Then depends how much the TLD owner wants to sell each domain for. And they will need to be competitive as there are potentially many options for users.

aleph answered 1 year ago
Applications Fees will cost be between $100,000 – $500,000 NON-

REFUNDABLE.

You must prove technical competence to run the registry which some estimate

can run into millions. This is designed for Big Corporations.

The internet is being catalogued and sold to Big Money interests.

All the domains in the new TLD can be kept, sold at whatever price

the owner pleases or rented. The best TLDs will be auctioned to the highest

bidder. Good luck with your application.

:rolleyes:

Dominique answered 1 year ago
I think so too, I think you are buying the rights to the .whatever , and most people will resell the resulting domains like a registrar.

answered 1 year ago

The new domains could cost as much as $100,000 to register, and will require a large amount of recourses to maintain.

Re-reading this, I think whoever wrote this has got confused. I think he/she is referring to running the TLD for the .anything itself. The BBC has an article on it at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7475986.stm and I think there’s a similar misconception because in there it says:

However, the cost of setting up a domain – at least initially – will be an expensive business.

and…

Individuals will be able to register a domain based on their own name, for example, as long as they can show a “business plan and technical capacity“.

Setting up“…”Technical capacity“? To have a domain name? No way. They are referring to the registrar who sets up and sells the TLD IMO.

Anonymous answered 1 year ago
sorry if I sounded too strong. if it was … it wasn’t aimed at you Simmo, … I am still reelin’ from this news as I don’t see a whole lot of good to come from it but I sure see a whole lot of possible bad coming from it.

Its like my worst fears of the net are coming true, except in my vision the search engines on top of what they do now, … become affiliates to every possible niche and of course put their links up first for any search remotely close to what they’re selling.

I’m not so sure this won’t have a similar effect. And the part about having to have a business plan … . really scary stuff. Like ….. lets not only rape them financially but lets also make sure its “our kind of people” that get control of these major domains.

and I bet they push all this thru before enough people wake up and say stop and once they get it done its done.

answered 1 year ago
Hi BBS

I wasn’t actually saying it’s right or wrong – in both posts I suggested it may be one or the other…merely trying to point out that at the moment its all speculation and the coin could drop either way but I think it’s right in any speculative debate to point out it has two potential ways of falling, hence why I thought the other side was worth a quick look to check it wasn’t a two-headed coin <span title=” title=”” class=”bbcode_smiley” />

Cheers

Simmo!

Anonymous answered 1 year ago
Hi all,

I seldom disagree with you Simmo but this time I think you got it all wrong.

there’s nothing good about setting up a system that totally cuts the little guy out. That was what made the net great.

Ya only the big money will have the resources to even compete for top domains ….. this really makes me sick.

So basically those behind all this set things up so they got almost every cent possible squeezed out of the .com , got a pretty good chunk of .org and .net … and now that they’ve capitalized on all that as much as possible they turn around and make all those domains that were worth so much … not looking so good now …

and clean up on releasing all those possibilities.

Nobody knows what or how the SEs will handle this but I’m betting they give preference to gambling.gambling for the keywords gambling and similar … over what they’re gonna give you points for a domain like fredsgambling.com

this really is disheartening to find out. I hope its not as big a fiasco as I suspect it might be.

aleph answered 1 year ago
Hi BB1,

It is important … it means the end of the internet as we know it.

It means you can apply for .vegas as an extension and sell

or use all the domains before it. It will turn the internet upside down and

backwards literally.

:hattip: