VOTES THAT COULD HAVE MADE A DIFFERENCE ON HR 5767 In a dead tie, these politicians could have achieved a positive result HR5767, Rep. Barney Frank's attempt to halt the implementation of the UIGEA regulations until a clear definition was available, and a subsequent amendment calling for more clarity, were defeated last month when a 32-32 vote failed to pass the proposal through the House Finanacial Services Committee (see previous InfoPowa report). revealed this week that the difference between success and failure in such a close-run vote could have been in the hands of four Democrats who voted against HR5767, the Payment Systems Protection Act. The same might be said for the three Republicans who voted against the measure, too. And there were several members of Congress absent from both sides of the 70-strong House Financial Services Committee. CardPlayer points out that the defeat of HR5767 is not the end of the road in the search for a solution to the confusing and largely negative American legal situation regarding online gambling.  Still in the wings is Frank's HR2046 Internet Gambling Regulation and Enforcement Act, empowering individual states to regulate and tax online gambling. With 48 co-sponsors across party lines so far, this measure is currently before Congress's Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade and Consumer Protection. Nevada Representative Shelley Berkley's HR2140, which has the support of the AGA, is before the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security at present and has attracted 73 co-sponsors. Berkley's proposal is for a thorough and independent study of the online gambling scene by the National Academy of Sciences to help define the pros and cons of regulating the pastime. HR2610 is a proposal introduced by Florida politico Robert Wexler that seeks to classify poker and certain other games as games of skill rather than chance, thus exempting these from the UIGEA. It, too currently rests in the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security and has 22 co-sponsors. Finally, HR2607 is a bill launched by Representative Jim McDermott last year wants to change the tax provisions of the Internet Revenue Code in order to regulate online gambling, and is identified strongly in some quarters with HR2046. This has the least support at 1 co-sponsor and is in the Ways and Means Committee of the House.

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