More media pundits in California are coming out in favor of regulating online poker. They mostly argue the economic factor: “Online poker profits are simply money that has left our state’s economy, never to return,” writes Eric Hogue.

“Why should I be against the state’s collecting over $100 million annually from online poker profits, while I allow the legislators to seize more of my income, my vehicle license fees and sales taxes to satisfy their spending?” Hogue adds.

But the real news is that opinion seems largely shared by the citizens of California. A recent Tulchin poll concluded that 66 percent of California voters support regulating and taxing Internet poker in the golden state.

“The survey also finds that voters want online poker sites operating in California to be based in California and regulated by the state,” according to the Orange County Register. “Tulchin estimates 65 percent of voters prefer California operators to those in other states while 76 percent prefer California operators to sites based off-shore.”

Not a great omen for existing casino affiliate marketing plans, much of which is based on European and Mediterranean companies. But under Rod Wright’s online poker bill, overseas operators would likely be allowed to do business in California, provided they acquire the correct licensing.

In Senator Correa’s bill, however, it’s mostly the land-based casino operators who would benefit, and likely go on to control and monopolize the California online gambling market. That would force out the international brands that most casino affiliates promote.

More on the differences between the two California online poker bills here.

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