Lee Amatis, Cantor Gaming Boss

As this week’s gaming headlines prove, a lot of the iGaming business is about wading through regulations and waiting for lawmakers to stamp an OK on your business model.

Of course there are always a few folks who like to play fast and loose with the rules, and those folks made a couple appearances in the news this week, too.

Gambling News

Delaware iGaming Soft Launch – Full internet casino gambling in the state of Delaware got its soft launch this week when three play money sites went live. Two of the sites are associated with big names (888 Holdings and DoubleDown Casino). Real money gambling gets its debut in the First State later this month.

Bodog Asia – Three former Bodog Asia employees are under investigation for a bizarre crime wave that included practically everything murder and kitten juggling. All three are looking at some serious charges, though Bodog officials say the trio did only minimal damage to the company’s bottom line.

Cantor Gaming Boss Accused of Illegal Sports Betting – Cantor gaming top dog Lee Amaitis has been accused of allowing runners to place illegal bets at Cantor sportsbooks in Las Vegas. This intersection of regulated and illegal gambling could spell trouble for firm that dominates sports wagering in Nevada.

Gibraltar vs the UK – Gibraltar-based gambling firms are fighting a restrictive UK tax scheme that could suffocate their bottom line. At issue is whether players should be taxed at the point of consumption (the UK) or elsewhere.


Microsoft Search Revenue Up 47% – Microsoft’s Bing search engine may not be on par with Google, but they’re doing something right. Last year search revenues at Microsoft were up 47% over the previous year.

No-Follow Explained (For Real) – Do you know when to use the no-follow tag and when to skip it? Maybe, but SearchEngineLand did a really good job of explaining it this week.

Google Updates AdWords Rank Algorithm – Google rolled out a new AdWords Rank algorithm that takes into consideration ad extensions and other factors that were previously ignored or not given much weight.

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