The Department of Justice is just saying, “No,” to 1500 PokerStars remittance claims. This most recent batch of claims includes a large number of affiliates who aren’t likely to ever see money they earned for sending players to PokerStars in the heady pre-Black Friday online poker boom.

For this unlucky group, the options for filing an appeal are limited and, if they want to start the process, they’d better get on it right away. All appeals from this group must be filed within ten days.

No one has published an exact list of the rejected claims but educated speculation is rife among the online poker media., recently reported that many of the claims in this group apparently come from high stakes players. (Their reporting is based on anecdotal evidence from online forums, exactly the place where aggrieved players would be posting, whether they were in the right or not.)

Besides affiliates and high rollers, this group of rejected claims is believed to include a large number of players whose claims were substantially different from what the DOJ’s records indicated.

Even though this round of rejected remittancesĀ  may seem high, it’s actually pretty small in terms of the bigger picture.

As of this writing, more than 44,000 claims have been settled by the Garden City Group. That represents around 94% of all the outstanding PokerStars claims. There are currently about 3,000 unresolved claims in the system.

In 2014, the Department of Justice sold PokerStars and all its assets tot the Canadian-based Amaya Group.


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